June 22nd, 2010  |  By Mary Stucky

From a Friend of Round Earth

Places: Americas, Main, Mexico, Next Generation Journalism, North America  |  Issues:

Elisa Bernick (at left) is one of those people who never had to be convinced about the importance of reliable global journalism. She’s a former radio reporter and video producer and the author of The Family Sabbatical Handbook: The Budget Guide to Living Abroad With Your Children. I’ve used the fabulous checklists in this book to plan for a reporting trip and it’s a great resource for anyone who lives or travels abroad. You can buy Elisa’s book through Amazon or intrepidtraveler.com. Elisa currently works as a writer for The Family Handyman magazine, a national DIY home improvement magazine published by The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc. Here’s what she has to say about Round Earth.

Having worked as a journalist for 25 years, I know first-hand the power that excellent journalism has to crack open distant worlds and bring them directly to my doorstep. Why is this important? Because thanks to a story by Round Earth journalists, I suddenly discover that the beautiful bouquet of flowers I buy each week at my local supermarket is grown by a woman in Ecuador who supports her entire family through her flower garden. This knowledge, this sudden flash of recognition about how connected my home in St. Paul is to her village in Central America, makes the miles disappear and that bouquet resonate far beyond its beauty in the vase.

Making the unfamiliar familiar is a powerful force, and something that Round Earth journalists take seriously. Next generation journalists seek out the seemingly small and often hidden pieces of the world and place them in a context that helps us understand how truly interconnected we are. Stories about real people, not just the powerful elite, are like pebbles tossed in a pond. The ripples touch the shores of people’s lives halfway across the world. And it’s often those tiny details that touch us profoundly and propel us into action.

This kind of journalism isn’t easy. It’s grueling work that requires tremendous energy, commitment and grit. It’s not just about attending press conferences or researching online sources…it’s about listening, talking and walking among real people. It’s time consuming and resource intensive reporting that is rarely rewarded by mainstream media.outlets anymore. But Round Earth is all about the hard-to-get details. And that’s why it’s such an important organization to support.

Comments are closed.

Support more stories like "From a Friend of Round Earth" from Round Earth Media!

Our not-for-profit model is emerging as a way to provide high-quality global reporting to a broad audience, information upon which an interconnected world depends.

Your contribution is tax deductible. Please, join us!

Share this story

Archives

Our Partners

Round Earth Media is a worldwide partnership. For more on our partners -- media outlets, funders and academic institutions -- click on this link.