August 19th, 2014  |  By Round Earth Media

An unforgettable story of migration from one family’s perspective

Places: Central America, El Salvador, Next Generation Journalism  |  Issues: , , ,

José and Ester sent for their two sons, 11-year-old Kevin and 9-year-old José Jr. They were detained in Texas and transferred to a few centers along the southwest before they were sent to a shelter for unaccompanied minors in Miami and then reunited with their parents in Maryland. Their faces aren't shown to protect their identity.

José and Ester sent for their two sons, 11-year-old Kevin and 9-year-old José Jr. They were detained in Texas and transferred to a few centers along the southwest before they were sent to a shelter for unaccompanied minors in Miami and then reunited with their parents in Maryland. Their faces aren’t shown to protect their identity.

This story was originally published on August 19, 2014 on PRI’s The World. CLICK HERE to hear it.

Next Gen journalist Jennifer Collins brings us the story of one Salvadoran family through the eyes of many. This story is a part in a series in collaboration with journalists Manuel Ureste (whose work you can read HERE on AnimalPolitico in Spanish), Eric Lemus and Julia Botero.

More than 50,000 underage migrants, mostly from Central America, have been caught trying to cross the US southern border since the fall of 2013.

They face tremendous risks, just getting to that point. Some jump onto a freight train known as “The Beast,” where one wrong move could mean a lost limb — or worse. Some are kidnapped by drug cartels. So why, given all the risks, would any parent put their children through the journey?

Jose and Ester, who asked that their last name be withheld to protect their identity, are just such parents. They have two boys — the oldest is 11, the youngest is 9.

“They’ve been strong,”Ester said, referring to her boys as “my little bugs.” But she has been very worried about them.

“It’s not the same to say ‘Son, I love you’ from far away,” Ester said.

But that’s what they’ve been doing for years. Jose and Ester are undocumented immigrants from El Salvador, living in the suburbs of Baltimore. Like so many others, they left their kids behind to find work in the US. But El Salvador has become increasingly dangerous, especially the neighborhood where the boys live, near the northern town of Sonsonate.

“Sometimes, they have to take off running for the house because you can be caught in a gunfight there,” Jose said.

READ MORE

Comments are closed.

Support more stories like "An unforgettable story of migration from one family’s perspective" from Round Earth Media!

Our not-for-profit model is emerging as a way to provide high-quality global reporting to a broad audience, information upon which an interconnected world depends.

Your contribution is tax deductible. Please, join us!

Share this story

Archives

Our Partners

Round Earth Media is a worldwide partnership. For more on our partners -- media outlets, funders and academic institutions -- click on this link.