Next Generation Journalism

October 28th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

The Latest from our Migration Team

Jennifer Collins reports for PRI’s The World that new immigration check point along the Southern border of Mexico are costing locals their livelihoods. Listen HERE.

Salazar_GrindingCorn1Zahit Salazar rises extra early on the days she goes to market. It used to take the 78-year-old a few hours to get from her house in Mexico’s southern state of Chiapas to the market town near the border with Guatemala.

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October 25th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

Round Earth Media weekly, October 23

Keeping Them Safe in one of the World’s Deadliest Countries


Journalist partners in Honduras: Marlon Bishop (American) and Iolany Perez (Honduran).

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October 25th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

NextGen sheds light on growing numbers of HIV/AIDs in Morocco

Samir watches a group of men play soccer on a Casablanca beach. Morocco’s Ministry of Health reported that 2,180 men were documented as having HIV according to health surveys conducted from Jan. 1, 2009, to December of 2013. Effective research on HIV/AIDS prevalence in Morocco remains difficult in the face the disease's social stigma.

Samir watches a group of men play soccer on a Casablanca beach. Morocco’s Ministry of Health reported that 2,180 men were documented as having HIV according to health surveys conducted from Jan. 1, 2009, to December of 2013. Effective research on HIV/AIDS prevalence in Morocco remains difficult in the face the disease’s social stigma.

This story originally appeared on the Global Health Hub.

By Mark Minton

CASABLANCA, MOROCCO – With his fair complexion and auburn hair, 21-year-old Samir is often mistaken for a foreigner. But Samir is a native Moroccan, and he is also gay and HIV-positive – something many of his friends still know nothing about.

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October 24th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

From our NextGens on the ground in Honduras

NextGen Marlon Bishop reports back from Honduras: “Day 2 and already this is an amazing and fruitful trip. My partners are brilliant, brave, and easy-going, and Radio Progreso is a truly remarkable operation, doing so much with few resources.”

NextGen Marlon Bishop and partner Iolany Perez from Radio Progreso in El Progreso Honduras.

NextGen Marlon Bishop and partner Iolany Perez from Radio Progreso in El Progreso Honduras.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 18th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

Round Earth Media Weekly, October 15

Here’s something positive!Screen Shot 2014-10-18 at 6.04.38 PM

I know, I know, the news has been dreadful. The NBC cameraman with Ebola was – what else? –  a freelancer without sufficient health insurance.  Around the world, freelancers have replaced staff journalists as the source of our most reliable international news and information.

YOU can help help the great freelancers who look to  Round Earth for support — and who we all depend on to know what’s going on in our increasingly interconnected world.

Give to Round Earth Media’s cool new Kickstarter project and your gift will be maximized thanks to a match from a generous donor — turn a $10 donation into $15!

Please support these great young journalists who will bring you stories rich in humanity and place – from Ghana, Mexico and Jordan.
Heartfelt thanks from me and them!
Mary

Mary Stucky
Round Earth Media
651.470.1572 (mobile when I’m in U.S.)

@roundearthmedia
www.RoundEarthMedia.org
Mentoring and supporting the next generation of global journalists, while producing under-reported stories for top-tier media around the world.

October 13th, 2014  |  By Round Earth Media

Our NextGen captures the pain and resilience of Morocco’s “children of the moon”

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Our NextGen photographer Rachel Woolf captured the pain and resilience of Morocco’s “children of the moon” for the Baltimore Sun’s visual journalism blog the Dark Room. Click here to see the rest! For 800 children in Morocco, damaged or burnt skin is genetic, irreparable, and needs to be replaced. Mohamed-El Kotbi, 17, and Driss Hamouti, 21, live with this tragic condition. Due to a disease called Xeroderma Pigmentosum – which medical professionals generally shorthand to XP – they are prone to blistering and burning of their skin and eyes upon the slightest sun exposure.

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October 10th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

Please take a look!

Greetings!

I hope everyone will forgive me for this email blast. As you know, I founded and lead Round Earth Media, which supports independent international journalism from under-reported areas of the world and the training of young correspondents.

We’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign for reporting projects in Ghana, Jordan and Mexico. Please take a look:
If you can see your way to giving just $1 or more, we certainly would appreciate it. If you’ve already given, thank you! And if you’d be willing to share this with friends or social media, that would really give us a boost.
Here are a few incentives:

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October 3rd, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

ANNOUNCING! Round Earth Media’s first-ever Kickstarter!

Please give today! Somebody is ready to match the first $13,000 in pledges with an extra $6,500.  Think of it this way—if you give $10, your gift will bring an extra $5 to support our reporting teams.  If you give $50, we’ll get an extra $25 to help reach the goal and get our three teams into the field.

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September 25th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

Round Earth Media Weekly–September 24

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September 25th, 2014  |  By Serenity Bolt

Step into the world of love and witchcraft with our NextGen!

This story was originally published in The Riveter Magazine on September 19. Click HERE to read in on The Riveter.

NextGen Ailsa Sachdev spoke lifted the curtain on fortune tellers in Morocco and their important role in many women’s lives.

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(Illustration by Laura Hlavsa)

The first time Salma consulted a shawafa, or witch, she went with friends on a lark, solely for entertainment. When the shawafa predicted that she would never get married, an outrageous thought for a Moroccan woman in her twenties, Salma brushed it off.

“At that time, when we left the shawafa, we laughed and we didn’t trust her,” said Salma, who didn’t believe in witchcraft or magic.

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Support more stories about Next Generation Journalism from Round Earth Media!

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