In our interconnected world, reliable news and information is more important than ever before. Round Earth Media, a world-wide partnership, is training the next generation of global journalists while producing powerful multimedia stories on important under-reported issues — from the environment to women, immigration to music, and business to health. Through our groundbreaking model, Americans partner with journalists from the countries where we are reporting. Their stories reach huge audiences via top-tier media around the world. Support our work.

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We’re reaching huge audiences with important untold stories via top tier media in the U.S. and around the world. Next generation global correspondents report these stories with support from Round Earth’s veteran journalists.

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Places that are neglected or need better reporting. One example is Mexico where we are partnering young American and Mexican journalists to produce powerful untold stories via NPR in the U.S. and top newspapers in Mexico. Support reporting from a country that matters to you.

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Important issues that get lost in the daily news cycle: from the environment to women, immigration to music, and business to health. Support reporting on an issue that matters to you.

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In the Works

Reporting projects in Latin America and Africa and soon in Asia and Europe. In addition, our pioneering program in collaboration with SIT Study Abroad, gets underway every semester -- budding foreign correspondents guided and mentored by Round Earth vets.

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Help train the next generation of global journalists while supporting important stories from a country or about an issue that matters to you. Democracy depends on independent global journalism.

Blog: Next Generation Journalism

Get an insider's view on next generation journalism with Mary Stucky, lead journalist and co-founder of Round Earth Media.

José and Ester sent for their two sons, 11-year-old Kevin and 9-year-old José Jr. They were detained in Texas and transferred to a few centers along the southwest before they were sent to a shelter for unaccompanied minors in Miami and then reunited with their parents in Maryland. Their faces aren't shown to protect their identity.

José and Ester sent for their two sons, 11-year-old Kevin and 9-year-old José Jr. They were detained in Texas and transferred to a few centers along the southwest before they were sent to a shelter for unaccompanied minors in Miami and then reunited with their parents in Maryland. Their faces aren’t shown to protect their identity.

This story was originally published on August 19, 2014 on PRI’s The World. CLICK HERE to hear it.

Next Gen journalist Jennifer Collins brings us the story of one Salvadoran family through the eyes of many. This story is a part in a series in collaboration with journalists Manuel Ureste (whose work you can read HERE on AnimalPolitico in Spanish), Eric Lemus and Julia Botero.

More than 50,000 underage migrants, mostly from Central America, have been caught trying to cross the US southern border since the fall of 2013.

They face tremendous risks, just getting to that point. Some jump onto a freight train known as “The Beast,” where one wrong move could mean a lost limb — or worse. Some are kidnapped by drug cartels. So why, given all the risks, would any parent put their children through the journey?

Jose and Ester, who asked that their last name be withheld to protect their identity, are just such parents. They have two boys — the oldest is 11, the youngest is 9.

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